Roundtable Bleg

According to Bloglossary, To bleg is to write a blog entry or comment for the sole purpose of asking for something. Today, I am asking for input on what roundtable speakers you would like to see over the coming academic year.  As I indicated in Reimagining FASRI, we will be planning roundtables to serve three [...] Read more > >

Structured finance and the if-converted EPS dilution computation

This post starts with class materials, but ends with some questions for researchers.  As I was writing my EPS case for Intermediate II this spring, I ran into a kind of strange problem.  I picked 4 or 5 companies with convertible debt and fairly sizable dilution effects.  I then went to their EPS footnote to [...] Read more > >

Round Table: Recap of 2010 Financial Reporting Issues Conference

Our next round table will be Wednesday, December 8, from 4-5 pm ET. In that session, we will be going over some of the topics and discussions from the 2010 FASB/IASB Financial Reporting Issues Conference, which will be held this weekend in Norwalk, CT. As discussed on the conference website, the objective of this year’s [...] Read more > >

The New ASU on Disclosure of Certain Loss Contingencies

On July 20, the FASB issued a new exposure draft of their proposed ASU concerning disclosures of litigation-related loss contingencies.  For anyone who may not have been following this issue over the past 2 years or so, the FASB first issued an exposure draft on June 5, 2008 which proposed enhanced disclosure regarding contingent losses stemming [...] Read more > >

Manipulating relevance

As most FASRI followers are aware, the IASB and FASB are revising their Conceptual Frameworks.  The new and old frameworks posit that relevance of information for making decisions is a key attribute for determining if a particular number should be included in financial reports. Read more > >

Why powerful people are (sometimes) better liars

In a May 2010 Harvard Business Review article, Dana Carney (assistant professor at Columbia University) answers questions about her research that examines the relationship between a sense of power and the ability to deceive others. Although I highly recommend reading the actual paper (which is very well written, I might add), let me summarize the basics [...] Read more > >

More social objectives in utility functions

On March 9, Scott Dyreng led a session on how social norms affect people’s behavior.  I made a post a few days later on the subject with a cite to work by Steve Huddart.  Yesterday I saw another example of how social objectives affect employee utility functions, but this one seems quite different. Adam Grant, [...] Read more > >

Fix It: Roundtable with HealthSouth’s Former CFO, Aaron Beam

If HRC’s actual results fell short of expectations, Scrushy would tell HRC’s management to “fix it” by recording false earnings on HRC’s accounting records to make up the shortfall. – SEC vs. HealthSouth Corporation[HRC] You look back and think, ‘What was I thinking? Why didn’t I just do the right thing?’ But when you’re caught [...] Read more > >

Fix It: Roundtable with HealthSouth's Former CFO, Aaron Beam

If HRC’s actual results fell short of expectations, Scrushy would tell HRC’s management to “fix it” by recording false earnings on HRC’s accounting records to make up the shortfall. – SEC vs. HealthSouth Corporation[HRC] You look back and think, ‘What was I thinking? Why didn’t I just do the right thing?’ But when you’re caught [...] Read more > >

Comparing Commercial and Academic Risk Measures

I just read the introduction of a paper that compares commercial and academic risk measures (Price, Sharp, and Wood 2010). And the winner is (drum roll….) commercial risk measures in almost every test. Here’s the abstract: Although a substantial body of academic research is devoted to developing and testing risk proxies that detect or predict [...] Read more > >

  • Page 1 of 2
  • 1
  • 2
  • >